Canberrans encouraged to Kick to Kick 4 a Cause

Shane Rattenbury, MLA

Men seeking mental health support through Menslink are set to benefit from a fundraising event that combines a game of Kick to Kick with an attempt at an unofficial world record.

On 7 & 8 April, four Canberran blokes – Matt Cooney, Adam Hobill, Dave Gollasch and Anthony Weston – will be kicking off the event Kick to Kick 4 a Cause with the aim of raising funds to support Menslink in addressing men’s health issues.

 

Matt, Adam, Dave and Anthony all know about the stresses that young guys face in life and identified that men’s mental health matters are often overlooked. Their passion for bringing awareness to the issue is how Kick to Kick 4 a Cause came to be.

Having all been involved with AFL, the guys decided to take up the challenge of a marathon kick to kick event while encouraging the whole community involved.

The event is an unofficial world record attempt, with the guys aiming for 24 end-to-end hours of kick-to-kick.

Minister for Mental Health Shane Rattenbury today strongly encouraged the Canberra community to get behind the team and support them in reaching their goal of raising $100,000 for Menslink, a vital service that provides counselling and support for Canberra’s young men.

“Money raised from this event will go a long way to supporting the important work that Menslink does in our community,” Minister Rattenbury said.

Recently the ACT Government provided an additional $100,000 to Menslink to support a new service targeted at 10-12 year old boys.

“Boys who need extra clinical support or assistance from other services are connected with appropriate care providers,” Minister Rattenbury said.

Menslink CEO Martin Fisk said that young boys who have suffered trauma through family violence, bullying, grief and loss have already benefitted from the free counselling services.

“These issues come out as anxiety and stress or as uncontrolled anger and/or violence,” he said.

“Our counseling service supports these young guys through the issues that are troubling and affecting them, and teaches them simple techniques they can use so their feelings don’t get out of control. The whole family then benefits, as do their classmates and teachers.